Veterinary Pharmacy for Practicing Pharmacists


Program Details

  • Intended Audience: Pharmacists interested in Veterinary Pharmacy
  • Universal Activity Number: 0012-0000-19-026-H04-P
  • Contact Hours: 15.0
  • Program Fees: $299.00
  • Dates Available: 8/20/2019 to 8/20/2022
  • Activity Type: Practice

Summary

Pharmacists in suburban or rural community settings often receive prescriptions from veterinarians for small animal patients.  To prepare pharmacists to meet the legal counseling requirements, prevent or resolve drug-related problems and safely fill veterinary prescriptions, instruction on veterinary disease states and the human and veterinary prescription medications used to treat these conditions is warranted.  


Objectives

At the end of this activity, participants will be able to: 

  • Review terms and definitions specific to veterinary medicine.
  • Discuss the Animal Medicine Drug Use Clarification Act and how it impacts drug use in companion animals.
  • Recognize current topics in veterinary dispensing, prescribing and compounding.
  • Select the most appropriate veterinary drug information resource to assist pharmacists in safely filling veterinary prescriptions

Part 1: Introduction to Veterinary Pharmacy, Legal and Regulatory Topics and Veterinary Informatics

This section focuses on the unique legal and regulatory topics that are applicable to veterinary medicine and veterinary pharmacy. An overview of print and web-based information sources that can support pharmacists in meeting state-mandated counseling requirements, enhance medication compliance and facilitate effective communication with veterinary health care professionals is provided.

At the end of this section, the participant will be able to: 

  • Review terms and definitions specific to veterinary medicine.
  • Discuss the Animal Medicine Drug Use Clarification Act and how it impacts drug use in companion animals.
  • Recognize current topics in veterinary dispensing, prescribing and compounding.
  • Select the most appropriate veterinary drug information resource to assist pharmacists in safely filling veterinary prescriptions.

Part 2: Diabetes Mellitus, Anti-Infective Use and Thyroid Diseases in Veterinary Patients

Diabetes mellitus and thyroid diseases are some of the most common endocrine diseases seen in dogs and cats. Veterinarians will outsource prescriptions for anti-infectives to community pharmacies due to affordability, convenience or owner request. This section provides an overview of clinical signs, diagnosis, treatment and prognosis for each of these disease states or conditions.

At the end of this section, the participant will be able to: 

  • Compare and contrast diabetes in humans versus canine and felines.
  • Summarize the most common maintenance insulins used in the control of DM for dogs and cats.
  • List the most commonly used antibiotic, antifungal and anti-protozoal agents used in the treatment/control of infections in dogs and cats.
  • Explain the most common therapies used in the treatment of hypothyroidism in dogs and hyperthyroidism in cats.

Part 3: Congestive Heart Failure, Epilepsy, Urinary Incontinence and Separation Anxiety in Veterinary Patients

Congestive heart failure, epilepsy, urinary incontinence and separation anxiety commonly affect dogs and cats. There are a number of similarities as well as differences between these disease states/conditions in human patients versus veterinary patients. This section provides an overview of clinical signs, diagnosis, treatment and prognosis for each of these disease states with an emphasis on therapeutic options.

At the end of this section, the participant will be able to:

  • Describe the triad of therapy for congestive heart failure in dogs.
  • Select the most common FDA approved and/or compounded drugs that are used in the treatment and control of seizures in dogs and cats.
  • Outline the therapeutic options for treatment of urinary incontinence in spayed, female dogs.
  • Point out the signs of separation anxiety in pets and discuss the most common therapeutic options for treatment.

Part 4: Osteoarthritis, Otitis Externa and Adrenal Diseases in Veterinary Patients

Osteoarthritis is as common in veterinary patients as it is in human patients and the standard of therapy is NSAIDs. Otitis externa is a mixed-pathogen infection affecting the ears and has a characteristic odor with some dogs having difficult to manage cases. There are a number of similarities as well as differences in Cushing disease and Addison’s disease between human and veterinary patients. This section provides an overview of clinical signs, diagnosis, treatment and prognosis for each of these disease states with an emphasis on therapeutic options.

At the end of this activity, the participant will be able to: 

  • Explain the signs of degenerative joint disease in pets and the most commonly prescribed NSAID therapies in dogs and cats.
  • List the components of multi-ingredient otitis externa products in small animal patients.
  • Select the most common FDA approved therapies that are used in the treatment of Cushing disease and Adrenal disease in animal patients.

Part 5: Heartworm Preventatives and Flea/Tick Products in Veterinary Patients

The use of heartworm preventatives and flea and tick products are part of a preventative health strategy in small animal medicine. Many of the ingredients in these products may be unfamiliar to pharmacists with over-the-counter formulations of flea/tick products being sold in grocery stores and big box outlets where pharmacies are located. Therefore, this section provides an overview of the most common products in these categories

At the end of this section, the participant will be able to: 

  • Describe the advantages of preventative heartworm therapy.
  • Select the most commonly used ingredients in FDA approved heartworm preventative combinations.
  • Identify and summarize drugs used for the treatment or prevention of flea and/or tick infestations in pets.
  • Recall the contraindications of flea and tick products in small animal patients.

Disclosure Statement

The following program planning members have disclosed that he/she has no relevant financial disclosures. No one else in a position to control content has any financial relationships to disclose.

Elaine Blythe, PharmD
Associated Professor of Veterinary Pharmacology St. Matthews University, School of Veterinary Medicine Grand Cayman Island, BWI
Adjunct, University of Florida College of Pharmacy 

Randell Doty, PharmD
Clinical Associate Professor
Department of Pharmacotherapy and Translational Research
Director of International Programs
University of Florida
College of Pharmacy


Schedule of Activities and Requirements for Successful Course Completion 

Students must receive 70% or higher on 5 exams, complete, submit and receive a passing grade on all 3 case assignments, submit a pre-course and post-course survey and course evaluation.


Credit Reporting

  • The University of Florida College of Pharmacy will report CPE credit to CPE Monitor and CE Broker when applicable. If you would like a paper statement of credit, you may print it from your NABP e-profile.
  • All pharmacists and pharmacy technicians maintain their own license and/or certification and it is their responsibility to follow up with the Office of Continuing Education at the University of Florida if any CE credit discrepancies are found.
  • It is at the University’s discretion to award or deny credit to a late claiming participant (i.e. after 60 days of the participant engaging in a CPE activity) as it is the University’s CE activity and the provider needs to ensure the requirements necessary for credit are successfully completed.
  • The University may request access to CPE Monitor® if the activity in question occurred within the previous 6 months and with an appropriate reason for access, i.e. power outage, etc.

Program Financial Support

This course received no financial program support.


Computer Requirements

Computer and Internet access are required to complete this course. Course content is provided via Canvas.

The minimum hardware, software, and Internet requirements for Canvas can be found here.


Policies

Refund Policy for CE Courses

Privacy and Confidentiality Policy


Copyright

This course in its entirety is copyrighted by the University of Florida Continuing Pharmacy Education and may not be duplicated or reproduced for any other purpose without specific written permission.


Contact Us

For questions or more information, please contact our office.


ACPE Logo

The University of Florida College of Pharmacy is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education as a provider of continuing pharmacy education.