Consultant Course: Clinical Applications of Pharmacogenomics

Pharmacogenomics banner

Please note that we are unable to grant Continuing Pharmacy Education credit to students who attended the live Precision Medicine Conference 2017.

Program Details

  • Intended Audience: Pharmacists
  • UAN: 0012-0000-18-024-H04-P
  • CE Hours: 12 Consultant Recertification/general
  • Price: $360*
  • Dates Available: 5/11/2018-5/11/2021
  • Activity Type: Application

*UF Faculty & Preceptor discount rate is available.

Summary

This program focuses on equipping pharmacists & consultant pharmacists to translate pharmacogenomics science into daily practice.  Renowned speakers provide practice insight on individualizing drug therapy, laboratory testing, reimbursement and other emerging precision medicine topics.

This home study course is approved by the Florida Board of Pharmacy for 12 consultant recertification hours.  You must complete all 6 modules to receive 12 consultant recertification hours.  

 

 

Module Summaries and Objectives

Module 1: Pharmacogenomics Primer

This module will summarize the principles of drug metabolism pharmacogenetics and genetic medicine.

Objectives:Pharmacy Technician Training

Pharmacogenetics of Drug Metabolism: Parts 1-5

  • Summarize scientific principles of pharmacogenomics, including discussion of:
    • Human genetics.
    • Relationship between genotypes and phenotypes in the context of pharmacogenomics.
    • Types of polymorphisms, including single nucleotide polymorphisms.
    • Linkage disequilibrium.
    • Haplotypes and diplotypes.
    • Star-allele nomenclature.
  • Discuss the different types of studies in the pharmacogenomics literature and their corresponding levels of evidence.
  • Explain the contribution of pharmacokinetics and genetics to interindividual variability in response.
  • Discuss relevant genetic polymorphisms of important drug metabolizing enzymes and their potential clinical implications.
  • Explain the function and tissue distribution of drug transporters.
  • Discuss variations in drug transporters and their clinical significance
  • Compare pharmacogenetics and therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM)
  • List example drugs for which pharmacogenetics-guided TDM may be the most useful

Principles of Genetic Medicine: Parts I-2

  • Review DNA.
  • Explain the Human Genome Project.
  • Discuss the Central Dogma of Molecular Biology.
  • Discuss the Types of polymorphisms.
  • Define allele, genotype, and phenotype
  • Define linkage disequilibrium, haplotype, and diplotype
  • Introduce PharmGKB

Module 2: Clinical Application of Pharmacogenomics in Cardiology

This module will review the current and future implications of precision medicine and summary the pharmacogenetic implications in cardiology.

Objectives:

Pharmacogenomics in Patient Care: The Future is Now

  • Define precision medicine in the context of clinical care.
  • Summarize key milestones and accomplishments in advancing precision medicine.
  • Discuss the impact that precision medicine will have on medical treatments in the future.

Clinical Applications in Cardiovascular Pharmacogenetics

  • Describe clinical implications of genetic variability in cardiovascular pharmacotherapy.
  • Discuss clinical, patient-specific, genetic, and other factors that inform drug therapy changes in cardiology.
  • Summarize the structure and characteristics of representative cardiovascular pharmacogenetics implementations.

Module 3: Clinical Application of Pharmacogenomics in Psychiatry and Pain Management

This module will identify medications affected by multiple genes and summarize the clinical implications of genetic variability in pain management and psychiatry.

Objectives

Not Just One Gene:  Medications Affected by Variability in Multiple Genes

  • Identify relevant medications and potential clinical effects of individual variability in multiple genes affecting drug metabolism.
  • Develop strategies for integrating pharmacogenetic test results for multiple genes into clinical decision making.

Clinical Applications in Pain Management Pharmacogenetics

  • Describe clinical implications of genetic variability in pain management.
  • Discuss clinical, patient-specific, genetic, and other factors that inform drug therapy changes for select opioids.
  • Summarize the steps of implementing pain management pharmacogenetics.

Clinical Applications in Psychiatry Pharmacogenetics

  • Describe clinical implications of genetic variability in psychiatric pharmacotherapy.
  • Discuss clinical, patient-specific, genetic, and other factors that inform drug therapy changes in psychiatry.
  • Summarize the structure and characteristics of representative psychiatry pharmacogenetics implementations.

Module 4: Clinical Application of Pharmacogenomics in Education and Training

This module will summarize education and training in pharmacogenomics.

Objectives:

Taking a Novel Approach: Update on Innovations in Pharmacogenetics Education

  • Define the need for patient-centered teaching approaches in pharmacogenetics.
  • Summarize recent innovations in pharmacogenetics teaching and learning strategies.
  • Identify examples of novel teaching methods and resources for patient-centered teaching in clinical pharmacogenetics

Educating Patients and Providers in Clinical Pharmacogenetics: Efficient and Effective Strategies

  • Summarize needs and strategies for patient and provider education in pharmacogenetics.
  • Identify legal, ethical, and other factors that influence the scope and process of patient education for pharmacogenetic testing.
  • Identify barriers to adoption of precision medicine and educational approaches to address these barriers.
  • Discuss resources for patient and provider education in pharmacogenetics.

Module 5: Clinical Application of Pharmacogenomics in Oncology, Adverse Reactions and Electronic Health Record

This module will summarize pharmacogenomics in oncology, adverse reactions, and electronic health records.

Objectives:

Clinical Applications in Oncology Pharmacogenetics

  • Describe clinical implications of genetic variability in oncology pharmacotherapy.
  • Discuss clinical, patient-specific, genetic, and other factors that inform drug therapy changes in oncology.
  • Summarize the structure and characteristics of representative oncology pharmacogenetics implementations.

Clinical Applications of Pharmacogenetics in Hypersensitivity/Adverse Drug Reactions

  • Discuss the mechanism of drug-induced hypersensitivity.
  • Summarize the evidence and discuss clinical implications for the association of HLA-B and HLA-A with carbamazepine-induced hypersensitivity reactions.
  • Summarize the evidence and discuss clinical implications for the association of HLA-B with abacavir-induced hypersensitive reactions.
  • Summarize the evidence and discuss clinical implications for the association of HLA-B with allopurinol-induced hypersensitive reactions.

Module 6:  Clinical Implementations of Pharmacogenomics

This module will summarize how to develop a clinical pharmacogenetic service, test and reimburse for pharmacogenetic results, and design electronic and written documentation.

Objectives:

Laboratory Testing in Clinical Pharmacogenetics: How to Choose a Commercial Laboratory

  • Compare and contrast approaches to clinical laboratory testing in pharmacogenomics.
  • Explain practice-based differences between panel-based testing as compared with testing individual genes for pharmacogenetic recommendations.
  • List criteria for evaluating commercial pharmacogenetic testing laboratories.
  • Identify essential information needed when interpreting commercial laboratory reports in pharmacogenetics.

Advancing Clinical Implementation of Pharmacogenetics: Progress, Needs, and Opportunities

  • Summarize current national landscape and trends for clinical pharmacogenetics implementation in various practice settings.
  • Compare approaches to genetic testing and patient care that may be used in clinical implementation.
  • List steps for developing a new clinical pharmacogenetics patient care service.
  • Identify factors that influence the successful development of clinical pharmacogenetics services.

Clinical Laboratory Testing and Reimbursement in Pharmacogenetics

  • Describe laboratory testing and reimbursement models for pharmacogenetic testing.
  • Compare and contrast various strategies and methods for pharmacogenetic testing and reimbursement in clinical practice.
  • Summarize reimbursement challenges in precision medicine and strategies for overcoming these challenges.
  • Determine appropriate use of CPT coding for pharmacogenetic testing.

Electronic and Written Documentation in Clinical Pharmacogenetics: How, When, and Why?

  • Discuss the role of electronic health record in implementing clinical pharmacogenetics.
  • Summarize current initiatives to improve integration of genomic data into electronic health record.
  • Identify barriers to implementing changes to the electronic health record in pharmacogenetics implementation and strategies to overcome these barriers in practice.

Speakers, Acknowledgements, and Disclosures

The following speakers have disclosed that he/she has no relevant financial disclosures. No one else in a position to control content has any financial relationships to disclose.

Caitrin W. McDonough, Ph.D.
Research Assistant Professor
Department of Pharmacotherapy and Translational Research
College of Pharmacy, University of Florida

Reginald F. Frye, Pharm.D., Ph.D., FCCP
Professor and Chair
Department of Pharmacotherapy and Translational Research
College of Pharmacy, University of Florida

Julie A. Johnson, Pharm.D.
Dean and Distinguished Professor, College of Pharmacy
Director, UF Health Personalized Medicine Program
Member of the National Academy of Medicine
Department of Pharmacotherapy and Translational Research
University of Florida

Larisa H. Cavallari, Pharm.D.
Associate Professor of Pharmacotherapy and Translational Research
Director, Center for Pharmacogenomics
University of Florida

Amber L. Beitelshees, Pharm.D, MPH
Assistant Professor of Medicine
Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Nutrition
University of Maryland School of Medicine

Laura B. Ramsey, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor,UC Department of Pediatrics
Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center

Scott Alexander Mosley, Pharm.D.
Pharmacogenomics Fellow
College of Pharmacy, University of Florida

Kristin Weitzel, Pharm.D., CDE, FAPhA
Associate Director, UF Health Personalized Medicine Program
Director, Continuing Pharmacy Education
Editor-in-Chief, Pharmacy Today
Clinical Professor, Pharmacotherapy and Translational Research
University of Florida

Susanne Haga, Ph.D.
Associate Professor in Population Health Sciences
Duke Center for Applied Genomics & Precision Medicine
Duke University School of Medicine

Megan Arwood, Pharm.D., BCPS
Clinical Assistant Professor
Department of Pharmacotherapy and Translational Research
University of Florida

Kristine R. Crews, Pharm. D.
Translational Research Laboratory Director
Co-director, Pharmacokinetics Shared Resource
Director, PGY2 Pharmacogenetics Residency Program

J. Kevin Hicks, Pharm.D, Ph.D.
Personalized Medicine Specialist, Department of Individualized Cancer Management
Moffitt Cancer Center
Assistant Professor, Morsani College of Medicine
University of South Florida

Mark Dunnenberger, Pharm.D.
Director of Pharmacogenomics, Center for Molecular Medicine
NorthShore University Health System

Victoria Pratt Ph.D., FACM
Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine
Director, Pharmacogenomics and Molecular Genetics Laboratories
Indiana University

James Hoffman, Pharm.D.
Associate Member, St. Jude Faculty
Chief Patient Safety Officer
Director, Medication-Use Safety Residency Program
St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital

 

Schedule of Activities

View all six module recorded lectures, read the supplemental documents, receive 70% or higher on all six module quizzes.

Requirements for Successful Course Completion

View all six module recorded lectures, receive 70% or higher on all six module quizzes, and submit course evaluation.

The University of Florida College of Pharmacy will report CPE credit to CPE Monitor and CE Broker when applicable. If you would like a paper statement of credit, you may print it from your NABP e-profile.

Program Financial Support

This course received no outside funding support.

Computer Requirements

Computer and Internet access are required to complete this course. Course content is provided via Canvas.

The minimum hardware, software, and Internet requirements for Canvas can be found here.

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Copyright

This course in its entirety is copyrighted by the University of Florida Continuing Pharmacy Education and may not be duplicated or reproduced for any other purpose without specific written permission.

For questions or more information, please contact our office.


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